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Chinese New Year (by Private)

Chinese New Year is an annual celebration held to usher in the new year. It is mainly celebrated in China and other countries with a large Chinese-speaking population, such as Singapore and Thailand, but celebrations of Chinese New Year are arranged in many Chinese communities all over the world. Chinese New Year, also called Lunar New Year, starts on the first day of the new year according to the Chinese/Lunar calendar. Since this calendar is based on the phases of the moon, the date marking the start of the celebrations varies from year to year. This year, the new year starts on the 25th of January. Often referred to as the Spring Festival (春节, chūnjié) in mainland China, it is the most important holiday of the year for many Chinese people. The celebrations last for 15 days, with each day having its own special traditions and customs. Although the traditions vary according to region, there are some customs that are common everywhere. Before New Year, it is traditional to do a thorough cleaning of the house, in order to sweep away bad fortune and welcome good luck. Houses are decorated with red paper cuts, often involving themes of good fortune and happiness, as well as wealth and longevity. Red is the main colour used for decorations, since it symbolises joy, virtue, truth and sincerity. Furthermore, the word red in Chinese is homophonous with the word for prosperity, making it an auspicious colour. This is also why wearing red during New Year is common practice.

Celebrations of Chinese New Year start on New Year's Eve (this year, the 24th of January), which is most often devoted to a reunion dinner, where family and relatives, often having come a long way to get together, gather to have a meal together. This meal typically includes eight different dishes, since eight is considered a lucky number. Examples of dishes are Buddha's delight, spring rolls, steamed chicken, longevity noodles and taro cakes. In many areas, fish is an important component, since the phrase 年年有余 (may there be surpluses every year) sounds exactly the same as 年年有鱼 (let there be fish every year, both pronounced niánnián yǒu yú). In northern China, eating dumplings for New Year's is very common. In southern China, as well as in many parts of Southeast Asia, it is instead custom to eat niángāo (年糕), which is a type of glutinous rice cake. Many reunion dinners feature a hotpot, since it symbolises the coming together of a family. Fruits commonly eaten during New Year include oranges and mandarins, since their Chinese names are homophonous with the words for success and luck.

LE male code: XinNi4nKu4iLe2020M

Apart from having a meal together, activities on New Year's Eve include lighting fire crackers, as well as giving each other money in red envelopes, called hóngbāo (红包). For many, the tradition of staying up through the night in order to increase one's parents' longevity, shǒusuì (守岁), is still a common practice. In China, CCTV has broadcasted an entertainment programme called New Year's Gala on New Year's Eve every year since 1982. Watching it has become a modern tradition for many Chinese people, and it has been recognised by Guinness World Records as the largest broadcast in the world, attracting more than a billion viewers in 2018. Traditional dragon and lion dances are a prominent feature in the celebrations, and huge parades featuring floats with performers and entertainers, such as the Chingay in Singapore, are held in many Chinese communities around the world.

The first day of the new year is devoted to the chasing away of evil spirits, which is usually achieved by making as much noise as possible, by lighting fireworks, burning bamboo sticks and using firecrackers. Some consider the use of knives and fire to be bad luck on this day, so they prepare all their food the day before. It is also considered bad luck to use a broom, since you might sweep away good fortune. The most important part of this day is to honour one's elders, which usually means visiting the most senior members of the extended family. The second day of the new year was traditionally a day on which married women visited their parents, relatives and friends, since they usually did not have the opportunity to see them very often during the rest of the year. During the third day, visiting people and receiving guests is considered unlucky. However, visiting a temple of the God of Wealth and having one's fortune told is considered favourable on this day. Since the official holidays for Chinese New Year are often only three days, the fourth day marks the reopening of business, with many companies holding corporate “spring dinners”. The fifth day is the God of Wealth's birthday, which is celebrated with dumplings in northern China, and lighting firecrackers in Taiwan.

LE female code: XinNi4nKu4iLe2020F

The sixth day is called Horse's Day, and is devoted to driving away the Ghost of Poverty by throwing away all the garbage accumulated during the new year celebrations in order to make room for a good new year. According to Chinese custom, humans were created on the seventh day of New Year, which is why it is known as rénrì (人日), or everyone's birthday. In Singapore and Malaysia, a raw fish salad, called yúshēng (鱼生), is eaten on this day for the sake of continued wealth and prosperity. The eighth day celebrates the Jade Emperor, who is the ruler of heaven. Many go back to work on this day, which makes it common for employers to host a lunch or dinner for their employees to thank them for their work. The ninth day marks the Jade Emperor's birthday, which is celebrated by offering prayers. The fifteenth and last day of Chinese New Year is celebrated as the Yuánxiāo Festival (元宵节), or Lantern Festival. Families walk the streets carrying lighted lanterns, and people light candles outside their houses to guide spirits home. It is also very common for tāngyuán (汤圆), glutinous rice balls served in sweet soup, to be eaten on this day. They are eaten for their round shape, which is thought to symbolise family togetherness.
The Chinese zodiac system consists of twelve different animals which are attributed to each year in a repeating 12-year cycle. The order of the animals in the zodiac (rat, ox, tiger, rabbit, dragon, snake, horse, goat, monkey, rooster, dog, pig) is usually explained by some variation of a legend in which the Jade Emperor arranged a race to determine their places. The reason why the rat managed to get first place was simply that it cheated. It had caught a ride with the ox by climbing onto its back, only jumping down to cross the finish line.

In contrast to the Western zodiac, the Chinese one is not based on constellations. However, the two still bear some similarities, since both share a belief that a person's zodiac sign is reflected in their personality in one way or the other. Different traits are associated with different signs, and some are seen as better than others. Since dragons are revered creatures in Chinese culture, they are often believed to be the best sign. However, all signs have their strengths and weaknesses, which means they cannot truly be compared to each other.

The celebrations of Chinese New Year this year mark the beginning of The Year of the Rat (鼠年, shǔnián). Traits associated with rats include kindness, resourcefulness and quick wit. People born in for example 1924, 1948, 1972, 1996 and 2008 would be considered to be born in the Year of the Rat according to the Chinese zodiac, but since the Lunar Calendar is not aligned with the Gregorian calendar, it depends on your date of birth (for example, a person born before 19 February 1996 would actually be born in the Year of the Pig). The years that are your birth-sign years are generally considered to be unlucky, so if you are a rat, you need to careful this year! A good way to avoid bad luck is to wear red all year round, since this is believed to ward off evil spirits. Since the rat is the first animal in the zodiac, 2020 is believed to be a year of new beginnings, opening up new exciting opportunities. That said, I would like to finish this article by wishing everyone a Happy Chinese New Year! 新年快乐!

To find out which zodiac sign you are, click here. If you want to read more about the different signs, click here. A big thank you to Eifos for creating these lovely designs!



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Somsoc wrote on 26-01 21:53:
Somsoc wrote:
Not gonna lie, I think my eyes hurt a bit from the really intense red and yellow 

Happy Lunar New Year ! 
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Wren2012 wrote on 25-01 21:00:
Wren2012 wrote:
Happy Lunar New Year! :)
Really nice article.
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Private wrote on 25-01 18:05:
BLNkBLrRY wrote:
:c i moved to another country to have better education and since the big exams are nearing i cant go back to my home country to celebrate cny with my family 

but happy lunar new year to everyone! i hope you guys get many 'hongpao's 

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December wrote on 25-01 17:53:
December wrote:
that sounds like so much fun tbh!! great article!! and thanks for the dress!!
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Photosynthesis wrote on 25-01 15:08:
Photosynthesis wrote:
I was born on chinese new year. Apparently my aunt was at a cny party when my mom went into labour haha
 
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Beyondeternal wrote on 25-01 13:40:
Beyondeternal wrote:
Thank you so much for the cute dress!! 
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Private wrote on 25-01 10:25:
Chlorine wrote:
Thanks for a good read and a nice dress! 
and the layout is as always, magical! ❤️
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Private wrote on 25-01 10:17:
Gengar wrote:
Corona virus lmao
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NixieFae wrote on 25-01 08:18:
NixieFae wrote:
I remember my mom figuring out that I was born in the year of the goat when I was kid and we were eating a Chinese restaurant that had those paper placemats with the Chinese zodiacs on it LOL. I always thought it was funny to be considered a goat!
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Krystle wrote on 25-01 04:16:
Krystle wrote:
Love this article, very interesting!
& amazing layout
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Sirenita wrote on 25-01 03:43:
Sirenita wrote:
love the layout and the colors 
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Private wrote on 25-01 01:02:
Era wrote:
Claire wrote:
Ella wrote:
Claire wrote:
the colors and pattern on the background make this really hard to read
I feel like the layout text is fine to read, but the comments is too bright. When u don't see the best in the first place, its a bit hard to read without squinting your eyes and getting close 
the letters are blending into the pattern on the part you read. i can't read it.
Fixed it <3
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Private wrote on 25-01 00:55:
Claire wrote:
Ella wrote:
Claire wrote:
the colors and pattern on the background make this really hard to read
I feel like the layout text is fine to read, but the comments is too bright. When u don't see the best in the first place, its a bit hard to read without squinting your eyes and getting close 
the letters are blending into the pattern on the part you read. i can't read it.
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Private wrote on 25-01 00:55:
Era wrote:
Troublemaker wrote:
Era wrote:
Troublemaker wrote:
nice article!
just a heads up, layouts are also about how people perceive colours and you know.. 
how comfortable it actually is reading. or if it blurs together
nice layout otherwise!
I know that and I am very sorry for the inconvenience   
oh no worries, happens to the best of us 💖

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Private wrote on 25-01 00:54:
Troublemaker wrote:
Era wrote:
Troublemaker wrote:
nice article!
just a heads up, layouts are also about how people perceive colours and you know.. 
how comfortable it actually is reading. or if it blurs together
nice layout otherwise!
I know that and I am very sorry for the inconvenience   
oh no worries, happens to the best of us 💖
Report | Quote | X
Private wrote on 25-01 00:52:
Era wrote:
Troublemaker wrote:
nice article!
just a heads up, layouts are also about how people perceive colours and you know.. 
how comfortable it actually is reading. or if it blurs together
nice layout otherwise!
I know that and I am very sorry for the inconvenience   
Report | Quote | X
Private wrote on 25-01 00:16:
Troublemaker wrote:
nice article!
just a heads up, layouts are also about how people perceive colours and you know.. 
how comfortable it actually is reading. or if it blurs together
nice layout otherwise!
Report | Quote | X
Private wrote on 25-01 00:10:
Ella wrote:
Claire wrote:
the colors and pattern on the background make this really hard to read
I feel like the layout text is fine to read, but the comments is too bright. When u don't see the best in the first place, its a bit hard to read without squinting your eyes and getting close 
Report | Quote | X
Private wrote on 25-01 00:05:
Claire wrote:
the colors and pattern on the background make this really hard to read
Report | Quote | X
Private wrote on 25-01 00:05:
Ella wrote:
All this time i have thought to myself i was a rabbit, because i was born in 1999, it didnt cross my mind that lunar falls after my birthday! so in reality I'm actually tiger! 

Also thanks for the code!
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Private wrote on 24-01 23:56:
Rochellette wrote:
I love Chinese New Year celebrations so much, the layout is amazing
Is nice to see how the homepage change with every new article
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Libertas wrote on 24-01 23:53:
Libertas wrote:
15 days of celebration damn, that sounds like my type of party! 🎉
Report | Quote | X
MissLondon wrote on 24-01 23:46:
MissLondon wrote:
Enjoyed this and the layout is AMAZING
Thank you❤



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