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LGBT Rights Around the World (by Private)

As you all know, June is Pride month, and it therefore seems fitting to dedicate this week's article to talking about issues relevant to the LGBTQ+ community. While much has been gained in terms of rights for people of the LGBTQ+ community during the past decades, much remains to be done. This article will explore the situation for LGBTQ+ people around the world today. For starters, although homosexuality has been increasingly accepted in many societies, it remains illegal in as many as 70+ countries in the world today. In eight of these countries, homosexuality is punishable by death. In other countries, same-sex relations are punished with several years of imprisonment. While these countries might seem extreme in comparison to many countries in say, Europe, it is important to remember that homophobia and homophobic legislation remains a problem in a majority of the world's countries. Several countries in the world ban discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation, but in many countries where homosexuality is decriminalised, homophobia remains a huge issue. As an example, homosexuality is no longer a crime in Russia, however, the implementation of the so called “propaganda law” means that homosexuality may not be depicted in a “positive light” in the presence of minors. This has led to the law being used both to detain LGBTQ+ rights activists and to stop Pride marches.

In a number of other countries, any kind of “promotion” of homosexuality is banned, and may result in imprisonment. Even in places where homosexuality is legal, prejudice and hostility against people of the LGBTQ+ community make many feel like they aren't safe. Many countries lack legislation that prohibits discrimination and harassment on the basis of sexual orientation and gender identity, thus leaving many people vulnerable to hate crimes, including violence, perpetrated by homophobic and transphobic individuals. Violence against people from the LGBTQ+ community and activists thus remains a problem in a large number of countries. As an example, it is estimated that as many as 380 people were killed in Brazil in 2017 because of their sexual orientation. This violence is a result of widespread and rampant homo- and transphobia, which was also the case in for example Bangladesh, where mobs of people have participated in the killing of several LGBTQ+ rights activists. Sometimes this hostility and violence against LGBTQ+ people is state sanctioned, as is the case in the Russian region of Chechnya where thousands of gay men have been abducted, tortured and killed by the government.

The situation for transgender people varies greatly across the world. In some countries, acceptance of transgender identities coexists with harsh laws regarding homosexuality, practically forcing people who are gay or lesbian to undergo gender reassignment treatment to be able to have relationships without fear of punishment. Being transgender is still seen as a mental illness in many countries, which adds to the stigmatization of transgender individuals. In several countries, gender reassignment treatment is available, but requires compulsory sterilisation. Additionally, legally changing your gender most often requires a diagnosis made by a doctor or psychiatrist. Notably, there are only seven countries in the world that do not pose any such requirements to legally change your gender. These are Argentina, Belgium, Colombia, Denmark, Ireland, Malta and Norway.

Although the situation for LGBTQ+ people in many countries remains difficult, progress has been made in a number of countries. The Supreme Court in India decriminalised homosexuality last year, and Botswana's High Court did the same just a few days ago. Other countries are spearheading the general move towards greater acceptance and equal rights for people of the LGBTQ+ community. Notable examples include Argentina, which became the first country in the world to recognise people's right to identify their own gender in 2012, with other countries soon following suit. Argentina have also ended a ban on blood donation from gay and bisexual men, something that many other countries have yet to do. Iceland is another leading country when it comes to LGBT rights. Reported to be the best in the world when it comes to social acceptance of LGBTQ+ people, the country allows same-sex couples equal access to adoption and IVF.

In 1989, Denmark became the first country in the world to introduce a special form of state recognised civil union for same-sex couples. 12 years later, in 2001, the Netherlands became the first country in the world to introduce same-sex marriage.Today same-sex marriage is legal and recognised in 28 countries in the world, with Taiwan,Austria and Ecuadorbeing the latest additions to the list of countries where same-sex marriage is legal. Australia, Germany, Malta and Finland introduced same-sex marriage in 2017, and Costa Rica is planning to implement laws introducing same-sex marriage next year. Just two days ago the highestcourt in Ecuador made a landmark ruling recognising a same-sex marriage after a six year long fight, thus paving the way for a new law legalising same-sex marriage. The pros of recognising marriage for same-sex couples are debatable for several reasons, and many LGBTQ+ scholars and activists have questioned whether same-sex marriage is a desirable goal, as many see this as a kind of assimilation into mainstream heterosexual culture. Although important, this debate falls outside the scope of this article, but for anyone interested, you can read more here and hereAnother issue that many LGBTQ+ rights activists have been fighting for and are still fighting for is the right to adoption and fertility procedures such as IVF for same-sex couples. Currently joint adoption for same-sex couples is only possible in 27 countries, the large majority of these being countries where same-sex marriage is legal.

Attitudes towards LGBTQ+ have become increasingly positive in many parts of the world, but homophobic and transphobic attitudes remain widespread. Younger people are usually more open and accepting, while the older generation remains more skeptical. According to extensive research on the matter, negative attitudes most often correlate with higher religiosity. Religion thus remains a deciding factor when it comes to LGBTQ+ acceptance. Many Christians in America especially are explicitly homophobic, and use anti-gay and -lesbian rhetoric to undermine the LGBTQ+ community's fight for equality and acceptance. Recently the US Supreme Court ruled that it was acceptable for a baker to refuse to make a wedding cake for a gay couple. While this decision stopped short of setting a precedent that would allow people to circumvent anti-discrimination laws for religious reasons, it highlighted the tensions between conservative Christians and proponents of LGBTQ+ rights. In Australia, a teacher at a Baptist school was fired for being gay, thus bringing attention to the loopholes in legal protection for members of the LGBTQ+ community.

Although the situation for people of the LGBTQ+ community remains dire in many countries, this article has hopefully demonstrated that change is possible and happening right now. Many steps have been taken to achieve equality and greater acceptance and respect for people of the LGBTQ+ community, but many steps remain. To end this article on a more positive note, the whole News Team would like to wish everyone Happy Pride Month!



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YSL wrote on 01-07 23:25:
YSL wrote:
Paramore wrote:
Djinn wrote:
What are those 8 countries with the death sentence for homosexuality??
Sweden, Norway, Denmark, Finland, Germany. not sure about the rest tho
lmao no 
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CrystalCastles wrote on 01-07 20:35:
CrystalCastles wrote:
Djinn wrote:
What are those 8 countries with the death sentence for homosexuality??
As of 2019, the following jurisdictions, all of which have sharia-based criminal laws, prescribe the death penalty for homosexuality: Afghanistan, Brunei, Iran, Mauritania, Nigeria, Pakistan, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Somalia, Sudan, United Arab Emirates and Yemen.
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Rosenbug wrote on 01-07 20:32:
Rosenbug wrote:
Paramore wrote:
Djinn wrote:
What are those 8 countries with the death sentence for homosexuality??
Sweden, Norway, Denmark, Finland, Germany. not sure about the rest tho
Sorry, but that's not true. I'm from Denmark, and i can tell that all of Scandinavia is v open to LGBT, and i'm pretty sure the same goes for Germany.

I think the countries with death penalty for homosexuality are the ones that follow the Sharia law, but y'know don't quote me on that :)
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Paramore wrote on 30-06 22:36:
Paramore wrote:
Djinn wrote:
What are those 8 countries with the death sentence for homosexuality??
Sweden, Norway, Denmark, Finland, Germany. not sure about the rest tho
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Djinn wrote on 30-06 22:35:
Djinn wrote:
What are those 8 countries with the death sentence for homosexuality?? :o
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Godis wrote on 23-06 19:11:
Godis wrote:
Good article and nice layout!
I thought Sweden did not make any diagnoses on LGBT people, but it may do so when you haven't written them.
Happy Pride Month!
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Snakkes wrote on 20-06 20:48:
Snakkes wrote:
Happy pride month!
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MaryJaneAnne wrote on 19-06 19:00:
MaryJaneAnne wrote:
Always love yourself.
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IiMehDaintyii wrote on 17-06 21:07:
IiMehDaintyii wrote:
Happy pride month to all! :3
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IiMehDaintyii wrote on 17-06 20:59:
IiMehDaintyii wrote:
Happy pride month to all! :3
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Ankanpartavaahto wrote on 16-06 15:57:
Ankanpartavaahto wrote:
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Toraix wrote on 16-06 14:49:
Toraix wrote:
Happy Pride!! 🖤
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Supergirl200 wrote on 16-06 12:34:
Supergirl200 wrote:
Happy Pride Month! 
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Magie wrote on 16-06 09:52:
Magie wrote:
happy pride month 
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Anastxsia wrote on 16-06 01:36:
Anastxsia wrote:
happy pride month everyone :) !!
this article is really interesting
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Private wrote on 16-06 00:15:
Rochellette wrote:
Happy Pride!!!
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Private wrote on 15-06 22:01:
Meowmere wrote:
happy pride month <3
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Libertas wrote on 15-06 19:53:
Libertas wrote:
Happy pride month <3
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January wrote on 15-06 19:21:
January wrote:
BloomCissi wrote:
January wrote:
God, I wish I could live in a country where I'd feel safe to come out to my family. Instead, I live in one of the countries where it is punishable by death. I hope, even if it has to be years in the future, that it will one day be a safe environment 
Oh my, I'm so sorry to hear that! I can't even begin to imagine how horrible that must be. Although I might never understand how it feels, don't hesitate to message me if you ever feel like talking about it. @January 
Thank you, I've just accepted I'll have to "stay in the closet" for a few more years when I can live on my own, preferably collage in Canada, and then come out to mayyybbbe just my mom haha
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Private wrote on 15-06 19:15:
BloomCissi wrote:
January wrote:
God, I wish I could live in a country where I'd feel safe to come out to my family. Instead, I live in one of the countries where it is punishable by death. I hope, even if it has to be years in the future, that it will one day be a safe environment 
Oh my, I'm so sorry to hear that! I can't even begin to imagine how horrible that must be. Although I might never understand how it feels, don't hesitate to message me if you ever feel like talking about it. @January 
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January wrote on 15-06 19:05:
January wrote:
God, I wish I could live in a country where I'd feel safe to come out to my family. Instead, I live in one of the countries where it is punishable by death. I hope, even if it has to be years in the future, that it will one day be a safe environment 
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Private wrote on 15-06 19:04:
BloomCissi wrote:
Happy Pride Month everyone!
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Platin wrote on 15-06 18:49:
Platin wrote:
Happy pride month guys
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Platin wrote on 15-06 18:49:
Platin wrote:



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